U. S. Supreme Court

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has struck down a section of federal law that prevented officials from registering trademarks seen as scandalous or immoral, handing a victory Monday to California fashion brand FUCT.

The high court ruled that the century-old provision is an unconstitutional restriction on speech. Between 2005 and 2015, the United States Patent and Trademark Office ultimately refused about 150 trademark applications a year as a result of the provision.

The high court’s ruling means that the people and companies behind those failed applications can re-submit them for approval. And new trademark applications cannot be refused on the grounds they are scandalous or immoral. Justice Elena Kagan wrote for a majority of the court that the “’immoral or scandalous’ bar is substantially overbroad.”

The Trump administration had defended the provision, arguing that it encouraged trademarks that are appropriate for all audiences.


Challenge to Trump’s steel tariffs rejected

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is rejecting an early challenge to President Donald Trump’s authority to impose tariffs on imported steel based on national security concerns.

The justices did not comment on Monday in leaving in place a decision by the Court of International Trade that ruled against steel importers and other users of imported steel who challenged the 25% tariff on steel that Trump imposed in 2018.

The importers argue that Trump does not have unbounded authority under the Constitution to regulate trade.

They say that job belongs to Congress. The legal challenge is at an early stage, before a federal appeals court has weighed in. The case could return to the Supreme Court later.


Justices side with business, government in information fight

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is siding with businesses and the U.S. government in a ruling about the public’s access to information. The high court ruled Monday against a South Dakota newspaper that was seeking information about the government’s food assistance program, previously known as food stamps.

The Argus Leader newspaper wanted to know how much money goes annually to every store nationwide that participates in the government’s $65 billion-a-year Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, called SNAP

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